Thursday, April 25, 2024
Advertisement
  1. You Are At:
  2. News
  3. World
  4. Corruption Perceptions Index 2022: Pakistan ranks 140 out of 180 countries; check full list

Corruption Perceptions Index 2022: Pakistan ranks 140 out of 180 countries; check full list

It is worth mentioning that the index scores 180 countries and territories around the world based on perceptions of public sector corruption, using data from 13 external sources.

Ajeet Kumar Written By: Ajeet Kumar @Ajeet1994 New Delhi Published on: January 31, 2023 19:06 IST
Pakistan Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif
Image Source : AP Pakistan Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif

CPI Report 2022: The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) 2022 was released on Tuesday, with Pakistan failing in making any improvement and continuing its position this year. According to the latest CPI report, Islamabad ranked 140 out of 180 countries — a position unchanged from last year. The latest ranking of the debt-ridden country illustrates that leaders have ignored anti-corruption efforts, with levels of corruption stagnating across the region.  

It is worth mentioning that the index scores 180 countries and territories around the world based on perceptions of public sector corruption, using data from 13 external sources, including the World Bank, World Economic Forum, private risk and consulting companies, think tanks and others.

India Tv - Pakistan's performance

Image Source : CPI WEBSITEPakistan's performance

According to the CPI, the scores reflect the views of experts and business people. The CPI ranks 180 countries and territories by their perceived levels of public sector corruption on a scale of zero (highly corrupt) to 100 (very clean) Interestingly, the rank was unchanged, its score dropped to 27 from 28 last year. 

Pakistan has a history of the highest corruption 

It is worth mentioning that Pakistan has struggled with the problem of corruption since it came into being in 1947, directly after the partition of India. As a result, Pakistan inherited not only the British legal framework but also the institutions prominent with their powerful bureaucratic elite trained to serve British rule. In addition, the anti-corruption laws of Pakistan were set up to protect the political entity rather than the society at large.

Considering this, it does not come as a surprise that the anti-corruption laws were virtually separated from the public’s interests. The subsequent changes in regimes between Military and civilian institutions due to multiple successful coups d’états further impaired and diminished the efficacy of the anti-corruption bodies, according to the European Foundation for South Asian Studies, an independent think tank. 

Situation worsened during Imran Khan's regime

Pakistan's position declined tremendously ever since Imran Khan took the chair of Prime Minister. In 2019, Pakistan's ranked 120 out of 180 countries, in 2020, it was 124, and it worsened further to 140 last year. 

“In some of the world’s most populous countries, corruption is worsening and governments are restricting basic rights and freedoms that allow the people to hold those in power accountable. Leaders across the Asia Pacific must acknowledge that inclusive growth must come with efforts to curb corruption," said Ilham Mohamed, Asia Regional Advisor of Transparency International.

"With elections coming up across the region in 2023, it’s time for public voices to be heard and governments to recommit to stopping the rot of corruption everywhere," added Mohamed.

Where does India stand?

Notably, there was no change in India’s score and it remained at 85th position, however, the report raised concern over the country’s democratic status.

Earlier in 2021, India’s rank improved by one place to 85 from 86th in 2020, according to the index. Except for Bhutan, all of India’s neighbours are ranked below it.

"In India (40), considered the largest democracy in the world, the government continues to consolidate power and limit the public’s ability to demand accountability," according to the latest CPI report. "They detain more and more human rights defenders and journalists under the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act (UAPA)," it added.

Notably, Denmark (90), Finland, New Zealand (87) and Norway (87) topped the list. While Somalia, Syria, and South Sudan are at the bottom of the chart with 12, 13, and 13 points, respectively.

Also Read: India slips six places to rank 86 on corruption index 2020

Advertisement

Read all the Breaking News Live on indiatvnews.com and Get Latest English News & Updates from World

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement