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  5. Bowler is setting field to a right-hand batsman: Shane Warne backs Ian Chappell over 'unfair' switch-hit

Bowler is setting field to a right-hand batsman: Shane Warne backs Ian Chappell over 'unfair' switch-hit

Maxwell himself opined over the legality of the shot after Australia's 2-1 series win against India on Wednesday, saying that the switch-hit is a part of the game's evolution.

India TV Sports Desk India TV Sports Desk
New Delhi Updated on: December 02, 2020 22:24 IST
Glenn Maxwell against India
Image Source : AP

Glenn Maxwell against India

Glenn Maxwell's switch-hits against India sparked a debate after former Australia skipper Ian Chappell questioned the legality of the shot. Concealing his poor IPL show, Maxwell looked like a different player while donning the Australian jersey. He took charge of Australia's middle-order and slammed half-centuries in the second and third ODI.

Maxwell, known for his ability to play switch-hits with ease, plummeted Indian bowlers with his explosive batting show. However, Chappell, who wasn't in favour of Maxwell's innovative shot, termed it 'unfair'. Chappell said that it’s very annoying when a batsman becomes 'opposite-handed'. 

“The Australian batting has been exceptional. They’ve made it look pretty easy ... particularly Smith and Maxwell, some of the shots he plays are hard to believe. [Switch-hitting] is very skillful, some of its amazingly skillful - but it’s not fair,” said Chappell during a conversation with Wide World of Sports.

Legendary Australia spinner Shane Warne has also backed Chappell amid the debate. According to Warne, a bowler has to nominate what hand he's bowling with, contrary to what a batsman does while playing the switch-hit.

“As a bowler, we have to nominate what hand we’re bowling with, and what side of the wicket we’re bowling with,” said Warne as quoted by Fox Sports.

“I’m setting a field to a right-hand batsman, so now when they switch-hit, I’m actually bowling to a left-hand batsman. I’m not sure I like it. It’s worth a discussion, worth a debate to work out what’s the right thing. Maybe the bowler can run up behind the umpire and bowl over or around,” he added.

Maxwell himself opined over the legality of the shot after Australia's 2-1 series win against India on Wednesday, saying that the switch-hit is a part of the game's evolution. 

"Like you said, it is within the laws of the game, that has always (been). Batting has evolved in such a way, that it has got better and better over the years, which is why see these massive scores are getting chased down and the scores are going up," Maxwell said when asked about Chappell's comments.

Maxwell also urged the bowlers to come up with a plan to combat the switch hit. "And I suppose it is up-to the bowlers to try and combat that," he said.

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