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More infectious but less deadly COVID-19 mutation good? Know what experts have to say

Paul Tambyah, senior consultant at National University of Singapore and president-elect of the U.S.-based International Society of Infectious Diseases revealed that mutation in coronavirus is a good thing and coincided with a drop in death rate.

Health Desk Health Desk
New Delhi Published on: August 18, 2020 17:44 IST
More infectious but less deadly COVID-19 mutation good thing? Know what experts have to say
Image Source : INSTAGRAM/MRHACKERCO

More infectious but less deadly COVID-19 mutation good thing? Know what experts have to say

As is the spread of the novel coronavirus was not quite scary, it recently came to light that the scary COVID-19 virus is now experience mutation. The multiplication of the virus was found in Europe, North America and parts of Asia. However, experts believe that it might be more infectious but is less deadly. Paul Tambyah, senior consultant at the National University of Singapore and president-elect of the U.S.-based International Society of Infectious Diseases recently revealed that mutation in coronavirus is a good thing and coincided with a drop in death rates. He added that the mutation will not impact the efficacy of a potential vaccine, despite warnings to the contrary from other health experts.

Tambyah told Reuters, "Maybe that’s a good thing to have a virus that is more infectious but less deadly. It is in the virus' interest to infect more people but not to kill them because a virus depends on the host for food and for shelter."

Researchers found the mutation in February and it has coursed in Europe and the Americas, the World Health Organization said. The WHO has likewise said there is no proof the mutation has prompted more extreme sickness. 

On Sunday, Malaysia's director-general of health Noor Hisham Abdullah asked more prominent open carefulness after specialists recognized what they accept was the D614G mutation of the coronavirus in two late clusters. Hisham said the D614G strain detected there was 10 times more infectious and that vaccines currently in development may not be effective against this mutation.

But Tambyah and Maurer-Stroh said such mutations would not likely change the virus enough to make potential vaccines less effective.

"(The) variants are almost identical and did not change areas that our immune system typically recognise, so there shouldn’t be any difference for vaccines being developed," said Maurer-Stroh.

 

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