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A closer look at Chandrayaan-2 launch: Camera onboard GSLV MkIII-M1 captured what no one else could

The magnificient images of Chandrayaan-2 lift-off were captured by several photographers, and people witnessing the moon mission. Perhaps, there are some visuals still yet to be seen. The video has been captured by a camera onboard GSLV MkIII-M1.

India TV News Desk India TV News Desk
New Delhi Updated on: July 22, 2019 23:54 IST
Chandrayaan-2 launched: Camera onboard GSLV MkIII-M1

Chandrayaan-2 launched: Camera onboard GSLV MkIII-M1 captured what no one else could | Watch unseen video

Whoosh! 2:43 pm on Monday it was. And India launched Chandrayaan-2, its second lunar mission, as Bahubali GSLV rocket successfully put the moon spacecraft into the orbit on a copy book style. The Rs 375 crore, heavy lift GSLV-Mk III rocket slung the Rs 603 crore, 3.8 tonne Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft in its intended earth parking orbit.

The magnificient images of Chandrayaan-2 lift-off were captured by several photographers, and people witnessing the moon mission. Perhaps, there are some visuals still yet to be seen. The video has been captured by a camera onboard GSLV MkIII-M1. 

CHANDRAYAAN-2 LAUNCH: CAMERA ONBOARD CAPTURES FULL VIDEO 

The launch took place from the Second Launch Pad at Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR, Sriharikota.  After the injection of Chandrayaan-2 spacecraft, a series of maneuvers will be carried out using its onboard propulsion system to raise its orbit and place it in the Lunar Transfer Trajectory.

On entering Moon's sphere of influence, on-board thrusters will slow down the spacecraft for Lunar Capture. Subsequently the orbit of Chandrayaan-2 around the moon will be circularised to a 100x100 km orbit through a series of orbital maneuvers.

On the day of landing, the Lander (Vikram) will separate from the Orbiter and then will perform a series of complex maneuvers comprising of rough braking and fine braking. Imaging of the landing site region prior to landing will be done for finding safe and hazard-free zones. Vikram will attempt to make a soft landing in a high plain between two craters — Manzinus C and Simpelius N — at a latitude of about 70° South on 7th September 2019.

Subsequently, the Rover (Pragyan) will roll out and carry out experiments on Lunar surface for a period of 1 lunar day which is equal to 14 Earth days. The mission life of Vikram is also 1 lunar day. The Orbiter will continue its mission for a duration of one year.

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