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1940 skeleton suggests Amelia Earhart may have died living as castaway, not in plane crash

A recent research has stated that Amelia Earhart – the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean – may have died after living as a castaway and not in a plane crash.

India TV News Desk, Washington [ Published on: November 03, 2016 15:01 IST ]
1940 skeleton suggests Amelia Earhart may have died living as castaway

A recent research has stated that Amelia Earhart – the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean – may have died after living as a castaway and not in a plane crash.

A skeleton found on a remote Pacific island may be the remains of Amelia who had mysteriously disappeared while attempting to journey around the world, scientists say.

The findings add to the speculation that the famous aviator did not crash in the ocean but landed safely on an atoll.

In an attempt to solve the mystery of Earharts disappearance, the US-based International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery re-examined evidence of a partial skeleton found in 1940 on a tiny atoll Nikumaroro which is part of the nation of Kiribati.

The skeleton was discovered three years after Earhart disappeared on July 2 in 1937.

Despite speculation in 1940 that the remains were those of Earhart, British authorities rejected the claim after a doctor concluded that the bones were from a male.

The bones were lost but the doctors files were uncovered in 1998.

The researchers have now re-examined the doctors findings which included the skeletal measurements, which showed that the length of the forearm was larger than average.

It compared the ratio of the skeletons upper and lower arm bones to that from a clear photograph of Earhart standing in a short-sleeved top and concluded that the two ratios were virtually identical, The Telegraph reported.

The finding adds to speculation that Earhart landed safely on Nikumaroro, also known as Gardner Island, after running into plane trouble during her attempt to find Howland Island, southwest of Hawaii.

Accompanied by Fred Noonan, her navigator, she planned to fly to Hawaii before completing her journey in California.

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