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Here's how you can witness The Great American Eclipse on August 21 from India

NASA is all set to live stream the eclipse beginning at 1 pm.

Written by: India TV Buzz Desk, New Delhi [ Updated: August 21, 2017 11:11 IST ]
A representational image of total solar eclipse

The August 21 solar eclipse has created lot of buzz and excitement among people. On Monday, United States is going to witness a rare phenomenon of total solar eclipse after a gap of 99 years. Last such celestial event was recorded in 1979 in US but was visible only from Pacifc northwest. However, eclipse like this happened in 1918 when total solar eclipse covered almost entire country. This time, the eclipse will pass through 14 states and people in US are gearing up to witness the astronomical phenonmenon. Though not directly but here's how you can watch the August 21 eclipse.

How to watch Solar Eclipse

NASA is all set to live stream the eclipse beginning at 1 pm that will also include pictures from satellites, special telescopes, high-altitude balloons and research aircraft. CNN will also do two hours of live streaming and reporting from various parts of United States. One step ahead, The Weather Channel will begin its coverage from early morning at 6 am which will continue throughout the entire day. Science Channel will have live coverage from Oregon and Madras for four hours including commentary from experts.

The eclipse will complete its journey across the US in a time span of four hours and four minutes. It will give scientists a great opportunity to study corona, the outer realm of the sun. It is interesting to know that such kind of eclipse happen every 12 to 18 months in the world mostly over ocean as maximum part of earth is covered by water. Hence, not visible to human beings. 

After the Solar eclipse, you can share your videos and pictures on our Facebook page.

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