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Quinton de Kock was guilty of deception: Shaun Pollock on Fakhar Zaman's controversial run-out

Zaman scored a brilliant 193 but his effort was not enough for Pakistan, as the hosts levelled the series 1-1 with a 22-run win.

India TV Sports Desk India TV Sports Desk
New Delhi Updated on: April 07, 2021 20:08 IST
Fakhar Zaman, PAK vs SA, Quinton de Kock
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The Pakistan opener had slowed down his pace at the end of his second run and could not make it back into his crease.

Former South Africa skipper Shaun Pollock on Wednesday talked about the controversial run-out of Pakistan's Fakhar Zaman during the second ODI of the ongoing three-match series. Pollock believes de Kock was guilty of deception and the incident should have been sent to the third umpire.

“When you look at the incident and analyse it, it's the action of putting the hand up, you can see the distraction for the batsman and the fact that he laughed afterwards,” told SuperSport during the third ODI between the two sides.

“I'm not saying that if he did that he knew it was wrong. I don't think a lot of the players know about this rule."

Zaman was run out in the 50th over and replays showed that de Kock tricked Zaman into believing that the throw was going to the non-striker's end. The South Africa wicketkeeper pointed his finger towards Lungi Ngidi but the ball was, in fact, thrown by Aiden Markram towards the keeper's end and it was a direct hit, sending Zaman back to the pavilion. 

The Pakistan opener had slowed down his pace at the end of his second run and could not make it back into his crease. Zaman scored a brilliant 193 but his effort was not enough for Pakistan, as the hosts levelled the series 1-1 with a 22-run win.

“Looking at it, it didn't feel right and I think it was definitely done on purpose to try and deceive,” said Pollock. “If you slow it down, it looks as though he was trying something (but) I don't think he was trying to cheat.”

According to MCC's rule "41.5 Deliberate distraction, deception or obstruction of a batsman", it is unfair for any fielder wilfully to attempt, by word or action, to distract, deceive or obstruct either batsman after the striker has received the ball.

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