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  4. NASA releases next wave of images from James Webb Space Telescope; scientists react

NASA releases next wave of images from James Webb Space Telescope; scientists react

James Webb Space Telescope new images: The first batch of images from NASA’s new space telescope was unveiled on Monday. Those images showed the Cosmas brimming with galaxies.

Hritika Mitra Edited By: Hritika Mitra @MitraHritika New Delhi Published on: July 12, 2022 23:08 IST
The images showed the Cosmas brimming with galaxies.
Image Source : @NASA The images showed the Cosmas brimming with galaxies.

Highlights

  • NASA released a fresh batch of images from its most powerful space observatory
  • World’s most powerful space telescope rocketed away last December from French Guiana
  • President Joe Biden marvelled at the image that he said showed “the oldest documented light"

James Webb Space Telescope new images: NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) on Tuesday released a fresh batch of images from its most powerful space observatory, the James Webb Space Telescope. One of the new images showed a blue and orange shot of a dying star. The first batch of images from NASA’s new space telescope was unveiled on Monday. The images showed the Cosmas brimming with galaxies. 

Here is what several scientists think about the second batch of NASA images 

Astrophysicist Knicole Colon's take on the importance of using spectroscopy

The Southern Ring planetary nebula 

Data scientist Giovanna Giardino explains how NASA's image of Stephan's Quintet reveals a sort of cosmic dance 

Deputy Project Scientist Amber Straughn details new discoveries about Carina Nebula

James Webb Space Telescope’s first cosmic view goes deep

The first image from the $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope is the farthest humanity has ever seen in both time and distance, closer to the dawn of time and the edge of the universe. That image will be followed Tuesday by the release of four more galactic beauty shots from the telescope’s initial outward gazes.

President Joe Biden marvelled at the image that he said showed “the oldest documented light in the history of the universe from over 13 billion -- let me say that again -- 13 billion years ago. It’s hard to fathom.”

India Tv - This image provided by NASA on Monday, July 11, 2022, shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope

Image Source : APThis image provided by NASA on Monday, July 11, 2022, shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope

The world’s biggest and most powerful space telescope rocketed away last December from French Guiana in South America. It reached its lookout point 1 million miles (1.6 million kilometers) from Earth in January. Then the lengthy process began to align the mirrors, get the infrared detectors cold enough to operate and calibrate the science instruments, all protected by a sunshade the size of a tennis court that keeps the telescope cool.

The plan is to use the telescope to peer back so far that scientists will get a glimpse of the early days of the universe about 13.7 billion years ago and zoom in on closer cosmic objects, even our own solar system, with sharper focus.

(With inputs from Agencies)

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