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Happy Halloween 2018: Here's how people are celebrating the spooky night with treat or treating

People across the globe are bringing the spirit of Halloween to social media.

Written by: India TV Lifestyle Desk, New Delhi [ Updated: October 31, 2018 10:44 IST ]
Image Source : TWITTER

Happy Halloween 2018: Here's how people are celebrating the spooky night with treat or treating (In Pics)

Halloween is celebrated on 31 October, which is the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day, also known as All Saints’ Day. The origins of Halloween came from the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain. Interestingly, Halloween is also known as: All Hallows’ Evening, Allhalloween, All Hallows’ Eve, or All Saints’ Eve. 

Halloween is the spookiest time of year and some people go to Halloween parties dressed in their most ghostly getup, while others stock up on themed sweets and chocolate. But do you actually know why we celebrate it, and why we go trick-or-treating?

The origin of Halloween in the UK has roots in the Celtic festival of Samhain. Samhain means “summer’s end” and was a celebration of the end of harvest season and the beginning of the “dark half” of the year. It was basically a way for the ancient Celts to say goodbye to the warm weather and hello to shorter days. They also believed the “veil” between the worlds of the living and the dead was at its thinnest during the festival.

People across the globe are celebrating the spooky night with all their might. Just take a look at Twitter. The good, the bad and the ugly are all there bringing the spirit of Halloween to social media.

It’s Halloween time – crisp air and crunchy leaves, the flickering of lighted pumpkins, scary movies, costumes, spooky houses and, of course, candy and trick-or-treating. But why do we do it? Is it just a fun excuse for kids to dress up and solicit sweets from strangers, or is there a deeper meaning behind the most frightening of holidays?

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