1. You Are At:
  2. Home
  3. Lifestyle
  4. Fashion
  5. Designer Masaba Gupta celebrates womanhood with colourful sindoor

Designer Masaba Gupta celebrates womanhood with colourful sindoor

Wear sindoor with a quirky twist of hot pink, suggests Masaba.

Edited by: India TV Entertainment Desk, New Delhi [ Updated: April 08, 2018 7:43 IST ]

Masaba Gupta's collection

Designer Masaba Gupta has sought inspiration from sindoor to style the looks for her latest collection and she doesn't feel that vermillion is old school. For some, sindoor signifies tradition and is a celebration of womanhood, while for others, it's an outdated statement women make about their marital status

Known for quirky prints and out-of-box styling, Masaba's new line is called Burning Garden. It puts a contemporary, playful, and vibrant twist to sindoor. "Since the clothes are so modern, sindoor provides a nice traditional touch to it. It is embracing the fact that sindoor is not a dated concept or old school," said Masaba. 

"Today, the use of sindoor has become more of a choice," added the designer, who is married to film producer Madhu Mantena. Masaba has come up with variations of sindoor by making it look more urban and younger.

"We decided to play around with colours. White sindoor is a fashion statement, while the hot pink is a slight variation from the traditional sindoor. Hot pink also represents the modern Indian woman... If someone wants to wear sindoor with a quirky twist, this would be the perfect way to do it," she added. Women are often judged by whether or not they are wearing sindoor -- of being "traditional" or not being modern enough. Is that leading to the decline in sindoor usage?

The next collection from @houseofmasaba & the ‘glorification’ of Sindoor. Sindoor is one of the strongest symbols of Indian married women in Hindu communities. Meant to represent the color and brightness in a married woman, the application of sindoor in the parting of the forehead, is a ritual that has been carried forward from the olden days to now. Today the use of sindoor has become more of a choice, and we at House of Masaba are happy to celebrate this. Many a times, I’ve come across women who have been perceived as too traditional or not modern enough, for wearing sindoor heavily. Our version of sindoor, seen in a knockout pink and chalk white is a take on this feminine symbol. This is a celebration of the new-age woman, a celebration of personal choice, or even a religious one; whether to wear sindoor as a minimal dot, or heavily in the parting of her hair…or to choose not to wear it at all. #ByMasabaGupta #FolksOfMasaba #TheMasabaBride #MasabaDesigns #India #Sindoor #Summer2018 #DestinationWedding #Festive #IndianWear #Monochrome #Gold #MasabaGupta #PotPrint

A post shared by Mufasa✨🌙 (@masabagupta) on

 

"Yes, I do (think so). We, as a design house, have a voice; and being a woman, I have an opinion that other women can relate to... sindoor can be a fashion statement (and) also a part of your daily life. With this collection, we are emphasising the choice of the modern women," she said. The designer, who is the daughter of veteran actress Neena Gupta and cricket legend Vivian Richards, says she has come across women who have been perceived as too traditional, homely or not modern enough, for wearing sindoor heavily.

"It's up to the modern age woman to decide whether or not sindoor becomes a part of her daily look. This is why we have shown it in different avatars, such as with dressier outfits like the sari as well as lighter and everyday looks such as kurta sets," she said. Would she agree that choices made by most women are often based on what others think or say? "Yes, they are. Because even today women are constantly judged for what they do or don't do. More importantly, women are judged for what they don't do. Like, till today, if you are a working woman, you are told to spend more time at home," Masaba said.

(With IANS inputs)

For all latest news, keep checking our Facebook page 

Promoted Content

Write a comment

india-vs-england-2018
monsoon-climate-change