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Tanzania Ferry Capsize

Tanzania Ferry Capsize

India TV News Desk [ Updated: September 11, 2011 10:05 IST ]
  • Child survivors are cared for after being saved from the waters Saturday, Sept 10, 2011, after an overcrowded ship sank in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday with about 600 people onboard. The numbers involved are unclear as the ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, is thought to have been heavily overloaded and some potential passengers refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. About 230 people have been rescued and 40 bodies recovered but about 370 people are still reported missing, said Mohamed Aboud, minister for the Vice President's Office. (AP Photo/ Ali Sultan )
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    Child survivors are cared for after being saved from the waters Saturday, Sept 10, 2011, after an overcrowded ship sank in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday with about 600 people onboard. The numbers involved are unclear as the ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, is thought to have been heavily overloaded and some potential passengers refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. About 230 people have been rescued and 40 bodies recovered but about 370 people are still reported missing, said Mohamed Aboud, minister for the Vice President's Office. (AP Photo/ Ali Sultan )

  • Tanzanian police carry a body from the sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)
    2/12

    Tanzanian police carry a body from the sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)

  • Tanzanian police carry bodies from the sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)
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    Tanzanian police carry bodies from the sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)

  • Tanzanian police carry bodies of children from the sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)
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    Tanzanian police carry bodies of children from the sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)

  • Survivors wait to be saved Saturday, Sept 10, 2011, after an overcrowded ship sank in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday with about 600 people onboard. The numbers involved are unclear as the ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, is thought to have been heavily overloaded and some potential passengers refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. About 230 people have been rescued and 40 bodies recovered but about 370 people are still reported missing, said Mohamed Aboud, minister for the Vice President's Office.(AP Photo/Capt Neil van Ejik Whirlwind Aviation)
    5/12

    Survivors wait to be saved Saturday, Sept 10, 2011, after an overcrowded ship sank in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday with about 600 people onboard. The numbers involved are unclear as the ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, is thought to have been heavily overloaded and some potential passengers refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. About 230 people have been rescued and 40 bodies recovered but about 370 people are still reported missing, said Mohamed Aboud, minister for the Vice President's Office.(AP Photo/Capt Neil van Ejik Whirlwind Aviation)

  • The president of Zanzibar, Ali Mohammed Shein, left, help a survivor from sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Khalfan Said)
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    The president of Zanzibar, Ali Mohammed Shein, left, help a survivor from sea in Zanzibar, Tanzania, Saturday Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Khalfan Said)

  • Survivors use flotsam Saturday, Sept 10, 2011, after an overcrowded ship sank in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday with about 600 people onboard. The numbers involved are unclear as the ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, is thought to have been heavily overloaded and some potential passengers refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. About 230 people have been rescued and 40 bodies recovered but about 370 people are still reported missing, said Mohamed Aboud, minister for the Vice President's Office. (AP Photo/Capt Neil van Ejik Whirlwind Aviation)
    7/12

    Survivors use flotsam Saturday, Sept 10, 2011, after an overcrowded ship sank in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday with about 600 people onboard. The numbers involved are unclear as the ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, is thought to have been heavily overloaded and some potential passengers refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. About 230 people have been rescued and 40 bodies recovered but about 370 people are still reported missing, said Mohamed Aboud, minister for the Vice President's Office. (AP Photo/Capt Neil van Ejik Whirlwind Aviation)

  • Survivors float in the sea, Saturday, Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are reported missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies recovered so far, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Capt Neil van Ejik Whirlwind Aviation)
    8/12

    Survivors float in the sea, Saturday, Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are reported missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies recovered so far, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Capt Neil van Ejik Whirlwind Aviation)

  • A woman passes the dead bodies displaysed in Zanzibar for the victims of the ship, Saturday, Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/ Khalfan Said)
    9/12

    A woman passes the dead bodies displaysed in Zanzibar for the victims of the ship, Saturday, Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/ Khalfan Said)

  • A Tanzanian soldier carries a body of a child in who was one of the victims of a ship that sank, in Zanzibar, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Khalfan Said)
    10/12

    A Tanzanian soldier carries a body of a child in who was one of the victims of a ship that sank, in Zanzibar, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Khalfan Said)

  • Tanzanians wait near the beach in Zanzibar for the victims of the ship that sank, Saturday, Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)
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    Tanzanians wait near the beach in Zanzibar for the victims of the ship that sank, Saturday, Sept 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Ali Sultan)

  • Tanzanian soldiers carry a body from a ship in Zanzibar, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Khalfan Said)
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    Tanzanian soldiers carry a body from a ship in Zanzibar, Saturday, Sept. 10, 2011. An overcrowded ship sank in deep sea off mainland Tanzania on Saturday with about 600 people onboard, and about 370 people are believed missing or dead. The ferry, M.V. Spice Islanders, was heavily overloaded and some potential passengers had refused to board when it was leaving the mainland port of Dar es Salaam, said survivor Abdullah Saied. It sank in an area with heavy currents in deep sea between mainland Tanzania and Pemba Island at about 1 a.m. Saturday. About 230 people had been rescued and 40 bodies had been recovered, said Mohamed Aboud, the minister for the vice president's office. (AP Photo/Khalfan Said)

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