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Iceland Volcanic Eruption

Iceland Volcanic Eruption

India TV News Desk [ Updated: April 19, 2010 10:46 IST ]
  • Hay rolls covered by volcanic ash are seen on a farm located east of the eruption in Reykjav k, Iceland, Sunday, April 18, 2010. Farmers across the region where the volcano erupted last week under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier have been scrambling to protect their herds from inhaling or ingesting the ash, which can cause internal bleeding, long term bone damage and teeth loss. AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti
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    Hay rolls covered by volcanic ash are seen on a farm located east of the eruption in Reykjav k, Iceland, Sunday, April 18, 2010. Farmers across the region where the volcano erupted last week under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier have been scrambling to protect their herds from inhaling or ingesting the ash, which can cause internal bleeding, long term bone damage and teeth loss. AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti

  • Farmland in Seljarlandsdal, Iceland, is covered with volcanic ash, Sunday, April 18, 2010. Farmers across the region where the volcano erupted last week under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier have been scrambling to protect their herds from inhaling or ingesting the ash, which can cause internal bleeding, long term bone damage and teeth loss.AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti
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    Farmland in Seljarlandsdal, Iceland, is covered with volcanic ash, Sunday, April 18, 2010. Farmers across the region where the volcano erupted last week under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier have been scrambling to protect their herds from inhaling or ingesting the ash, which can cause internal bleeding, long term bone damage and teeth loss.AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti

  • An airplane of the airline TUIfly.com is seen on the taxiway at the Tegel airport in Berlin Germany, Sunday, April 18, 2010. German air traffic control slightly loosened its ban on flights from the country Sunday, allowing some traffic at Frankfurt and airports in the north.The air traffic control agency said Berlin, Hannover, Erfurt and Leipzig were allowed to operate until 8 p.m. (1800 GMT) Sunday but only for some planes headed eastward. Flights were canceled across Europe over the weekend and northern European airports were closed due to a cloud of volcanic ash from an eruption near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland. The volcanic ash is a hazard to jet aircraft engines.AP Photo/Michael Sohn
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    An airplane of the airline TUIfly.com is seen on the taxiway at the Tegel airport in Berlin Germany, Sunday, April 18, 2010. German air traffic control slightly loosened its ban on flights from the country Sunday, allowing some traffic at Frankfurt and airports in the north.The air traffic control agency said Berlin, Hannover, Erfurt and Leipzig were allowed to operate until 8 p.m. (1800 GMT) Sunday but only for some planes headed eastward. Flights were canceled across Europe over the weekend and northern European airports were closed due to a cloud of volcanic ash from an eruption near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland. The volcanic ash is a hazard to jet aircraft engines.AP Photo/Michael Sohn

  • Spanish passengers rest beside their baggage at Bilbao airport, northern Spain, Sunday April 18, 2010, after cancellations of all flights. The airport was closed due to a cloud of volcanic ash in the upper atmosphere above much of Europe, emanating from a volcanic eruption near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland. The volcanic ash is a hazard to jet aircraft engines, causing the cancellation of many flights over European airspace.AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos
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    Spanish passengers rest beside their baggage at Bilbao airport, northern Spain, Sunday April 18, 2010, after cancellations of all flights. The airport was closed due to a cloud of volcanic ash in the upper atmosphere above much of Europe, emanating from a volcanic eruption near the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland. The volcanic ash is a hazard to jet aircraft engines, causing the cancellation of many flights over European airspace.AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos

  • A film crew working for National Geographic publication set up on southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier after landing on the glacier, close to the volcanic eruption, on Sunday April 18, 2010. Scientists say that because the volcano is situated below the glacial ice cap, magma is being cooled quickly, causing explosions and plumes of grit, with the eruption ongoing and forecasters have predicted that light prevailing winds in Europe mean that the situation for air travel is unlikely to change in the coming days.AP Photo/Reynir Petursson, Helicopter.is
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    A film crew working for National Geographic publication set up on southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier after landing on the glacier, close to the volcanic eruption, on Sunday April 18, 2010. Scientists say that because the volcano is situated below the glacial ice cap, magma is being cooled quickly, causing explosions and plumes of grit, with the eruption ongoing and forecasters have predicted that light prevailing winds in Europe mean that the situation for air travel is unlikely to change in the coming days.AP Photo/Reynir Petursson, Helicopter.is

  • An aerial view of the glacier where the flood water, lower right, was flowing into the Markarfljot river from the glacier, volcanic eruption and the cracks in the Eyjafjallajokull glacier Saturday, April 17, 2010. The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier continued to send ash into the air Sunday. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer term damage to world air travel and trade. The eruption is behind the photographer.AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti
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    An aerial view of the glacier where the flood water, lower right, was flowing into the Markarfljot river from the glacier, volcanic eruption and the cracks in the Eyjafjallajokull glacier Saturday, April 17, 2010. The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier continued to send ash into the air Sunday. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer term damage to world air travel and trade. The eruption is behind the photographer.AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti

  • Cars wait at a departure point at the car ferry terminal in Calais, France Saturday April 17, 2010. Many European countries suspended their air traffic due to ash clouds from the volcanic eruption in Iceland, again on Saturday. Train operator Eurostar said it was carrying almost 50,000 passengers between London, Paris and Brussels. Thalys, a high speed venture of the French, Belgian and German rail companies, was allowing passengers to buy tickets even if trains were fully booked. Ferry operators in Britain received a flurry of bookings from people desperate to cross the English Channel to France, while London taxi company Addison Lee said it had received requests for journeys to cities as far away as Paris, Milan, Amsterdam and Zurich.AP Photo/Michel Spingler
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    Cars wait at a departure point at the car ferry terminal in Calais, France Saturday April 17, 2010. Many European countries suspended their air traffic due to ash clouds from the volcanic eruption in Iceland, again on Saturday. Train operator Eurostar said it was carrying almost 50,000 passengers between London, Paris and Brussels. Thalys, a high speed venture of the French, Belgian and German rail companies, was allowing passengers to buy tickets even if trains were fully booked. Ferry operators in Britain received a flurry of bookings from people desperate to cross the English Channel to France, while London taxi company Addison Lee said it had received requests for journeys to cities as far away as Paris, Milan, Amsterdam and Zurich.AP Photo/Michel Spingler

  • A car is seen driving near Kirkjub jarklaustur, Iceland, through the ash from the volcano eruption under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Thursday April 15, 2010. The volcano erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air. Flights around the world have been canceled and passengers stranded as the ash cloud from the volcano affected operations at some of the world's busiest airports.(AP Photo/Omar Oskarsson) ICELAND OUT
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    A car is seen driving near Kirkjub jarklaustur, Iceland, through the ash from the volcano eruption under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Thursday April 15, 2010. The volcano erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air. Flights around the world have been canceled and passengers stranded as the ash cloud from the volcano affected operations at some of the world's busiest airports.(AP Photo/Omar Oskarsson) ICELAND OUT

  • This image provided by NOAA shows the volcanic plume, from Wednesday's eruption of a volcano beneath Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Using sulfur dioxide concentration data from the NASA Aura/OMI satellite sensor, it shows smoke, ash, and other components that can cause aircraft jet engines to fail. The OMI sensor can distinguish the differences between cloud, smoke, dust, ozone and other aerosols, and is important in Earth observations for aviation safety. (AP Photo/NOAA)
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    This image provided by NOAA shows the volcanic plume, from Wednesday's eruption of a volcano beneath Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier. Using sulfur dioxide concentration data from the NASA Aura/OMI satellite sensor, it shows smoke, ash, and other components that can cause aircraft jet engines to fail. The OMI sensor can distinguish the differences between cloud, smoke, dust, ozone and other aerosols, and is important in Earth observations for aviation safety. (AP Photo/NOAA)

  • Travellers wait at the closed international Airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, Friday, April 16, 2010. Most countries in northern Europe suspended their air traffic due to ash clouds from the volcanic eruption in Iceland.AP Photo/Martin Meissner
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    Travellers wait at the closed international Airport in Duesseldorf, Germany, Friday, April 16, 2010. Most countries in northern Europe suspended their air traffic due to ash clouds from the volcanic eruption in Iceland.AP Photo/Martin Meissner

  • Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Wednesday April 14, 2010, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. Flights in and out of London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, were halted, and the shutdowns and cancellations spread to France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland. The volcano's smoke and ash poses a threat to aircraft because it can affect visibility, and microscopic debris can get sucked into airplane engines and can cause them to shut down.(AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson) ICELAND OUT
    11/13

    Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Wednesday April 14, 2010, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. Flights in and out of London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, were halted, and the shutdowns and cancellations spread to France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland. The volcano's smoke and ash poses a threat to aircraft because it can affect visibility, and microscopic debris can get sucked into airplane engines and can cause them to shut down.(AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson) ICELAND OUT

  • Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Wednesday April 14, 2010, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. Flights in and out of London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, were halted, and the shutdowns and cancellations spread to France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland. The volcano's smoke and ash poses a threat to aircraft because it can affect visibility, and microscopic debris can get sucked into airplane engines and can cause them to shut down.(AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson) ICELAND OUT
    12/13

    Smoke and steam hangs over the volcano under the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland, Wednesday April 14, 2010, which has erupted for the second time in less than a month, melting ice, shooting smoke and steam into the air and forcing hundreds of people to flee rising floodwaters. Volcanic ash drifting across the Atlantic forced the cancellation of flights in Britain and disrupted air traffic across northern Europe, stranding thousands of passengers. Flights in and out of London Heathrow, Europe's busiest airport, were halted, and the shutdowns and cancellations spread to France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, Sweden, Finland and Switzerland. The volcano's smoke and ash poses a threat to aircraft because it can affect visibility, and microscopic debris can get sucked into airplane engines and can cause them to shut down.(AP Photo/Jon Gustafsson) ICELAND OUT

  • An aerial view of the glacier where the flood water, lower right, was flowing into the Markarfljot river from the glacier, volcanic eruption and the cracks in the Eyjafjallajokull glacier Saturday, April 17, 2010. The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier continued to send ash into the air Sunday. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer term damage to world air travel and trade. The eruption is behind the photographer. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti)
    13/13

    An aerial view of the glacier where the flood water, lower right, was flowing into the Markarfljot river from the glacier, volcanic eruption and the cracks in the Eyjafjallajokull glacier Saturday, April 17, 2010. The volcano in southern Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull glacier continued to send ash into the air Sunday. The Icelandic volcano that has kept much of Europe land bound is far from finished spitting out its grit, and offered up new mini eruptions Saturday that raise concerns about longer term damage to world air travel and trade. The eruption is behind the photographer. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti)

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