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Pakistan will not allow militants to use its soil for cross-border attacks: Gen Bajwa tells US

Pakistan Army Chief General Qamar Bajwa on Monday assured the United States that his country will not allow militants to use its soil for conducting attacks against any other nation.

India TV News Desk, New Delhi [Updated:23 May 2017, 7:15 AM IST]
General Qamar Bajwa
General Qamar Bajwa - File photo

Pakistan Army Chief General Qamar Bajwa on Monday assured the United States that his country will not allow militants to use its soil for conducting attacks against any other nation.

General Bajwa made the assurance during his meeting with US Ambassador David Hale, according to a report in The Express Tribune.

A statement issued by the US Embassy in Islamabad said that both General Bajwa and David Hale reiterated the commitment of their respective countries to a secure, stable, and prosperous Afghanistan.

Ambassador Hale, the statement said, reiterated US President Donald Trump's call during his recent speech at the Arab-Islami summit for a vision of peace, security, and prosperity, and unity in conquering extremism and terrorism.

"Ambassador Hale affirmed Pakistan's role and great sacrifices in this effort," it said.

A similar statement was released by the Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR), which said that the US ambassador acknowledged Pakistan Army's efforts in securing control of areas on Pakistan side of the border.

"Both the countries can carry forward the work done towards enduring peace and stability in the region through enhanced coordination and cooperation," the military media wing quoted Hale as saying.

 

The Army chief also made it clear that no cross-border attack shall be tolerated by Pakistan.

Islamabad blames Kabul for hosting Jamaat-ul-Ahrar and other militants responsible for carrying out a wave of attacks in February that killed over 130 people across the country and prompted fears of a militant resurgence.