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This kind of men are better lovers, study says

Dating a bisexual man is still a taboo. But the studies suggest that the bisexual men can be better at loving.
India TV Lifestyle Desk, New Delhi [Published on:12 Apr 2017, 11:08 AM]
This kind of men are better lovers, study says - India Tv
This kind of men are better lovers, study says

Dating a bisexual man is still a taboo. But the studies suggest that the bisexual men can be better at loving. 

A few taps of Google drags up countless pieces dissecting the question 'would you date a bisexual guy?' And Amber Rose, the public figure who is well-known for standing against slut-shaming and having a sex positive attitude, recently said she would not date a bisexual man. "Personally-no judgment-I wouldn't be comfortable. I just wouldn't be comfortable with it and I don't know why," she said during a Facebook Q&A.

 Research has found that men who are bisexual - and feel comfortable being out - are better in bed - and the relationship develops - more caring long-term partners and fathers. Some women who took part in an Australian study even said they would never be able to go back to dating straight men at all. It turned out that straight men were the ones with more emotional and misogynistic baggage.

"We had some women who said that after dating a bi man, they could never go back to dating a straight man."

She adds: "In most films, bisexual men have either been killed, suicided, or been killers. And been the HIV carriers into the straight world. Very few films, and only recently has film begun to explore polyamory and bisexuality, and women in relationships with bisexual men, in a more positive and varied light."

However, it would be a mistake to paint relationships between bisexual men and women as black and white utopias. When the men did not feel comfortable coming out, misogyny and violence continued to be issues. This was generally a response to "incredible stigmatisation, marginalisation, and discrimination for their bisexuality," says Dr Pallotta-Chiarolli.

"One example was of a man who basically married his female partner to cover his same-sex attractions," says Dr Pallotta-Chiarolli. "He did, however, go overseas and brought his male partner back. He threatened her not to say anything to their religious and ethnic community, and she basically became their housekeeper and for the mother of his children."

"Another older feminist independent woman said to her partner, 'You've been so awesome to me. We have grandkids. We've lived an amazing life. You've fallen in love with this other guy now, and I think you deserve to go live with him for a while. Just come and visit me periodically.'"

"Some bi men and their partners felt they no longer belonged and were discriminated against by gay men and lesbians. Some women who had been loved by gay men were now hearing comments like, 'You'd better lock your boyfriends away, the female predator is here'," says Dr Pallotta-Chiarolli.